Ravagh Persian Grill – Restaurant Review

Ever since I was invited to a Persian dinner at my best friend’s house in Israel (yes, there are plenty of Iranian Jews in Israel), my obsession with this rich cuisine has grown immensely. NYC is known for its culinary diversity, and exploring this diversity was always on top of my list ever since I started working in the city.

A few weeks ago our friend Roni traveled from London to visit her family that lives in the city. Irm and I thought it would be a great idea to meet over dinner and have some great time together, which we did. I checked Yelp for the closest Persian restaurant in the vicinity and came up with Ravagh Persian Grill. Sure, why not. We were hungry, and didn’t feel like taking the train (rush hour) or walking too long (too hungry).

One thing I always look at when going to a restaurant that serves specialized food is how authentic the diners that sit around the table are. As a rule of thumb it is always good to see people from the same ethnic group dining at the restaurant. It shows (in most cases) that the food is closer to ‘home’. It certainly true for our favorite Turkish place. This place had plenty Iranians dining in that looked like they were having a good time.

The food was good. I ordered the sultani kebab and Irm ordered the Koobideh kebab. Both were good. The rice was good as well, but in retrospect I should have asked for the “green rice” (dilled rice cooked with fava beans). I love (a good) Persian rice and this would have been a great opportunity to taste something I really like. Our friend Roni ordered the lamb shank, which by the way looked great.

Overall it was a pleasant experience. We will come back.

The images below is something I found on the web.

Sultani Kebab
Sultani Kebab

Lamb Shank
Lamb Shank

As a side note, one of my favorite Persian dishes is the Gondi dumpling (see image below). This is a dish I had at my friend’s house, and only recently found out that:

Gondi is said to have originated in the Jewish ghetto in Tehran, although Jews from the other Iranian cities also claim to be its inventors. Gondi was a special food prepared only for Shabbat because ground lamb or chicken was expensive. While Iranian Jews have over the centuries eaten the same types of foods as otherIranians, Gondi has been one of their few culinary innovations that they can claim their own

Gondi
Gondi

Go figure…

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